Category: Publikasjoner


Ny populærvitenskapelig artikkel

Jan Mangerud har skrevet en populærartikkel om forløpet av siste istid i Geonytt, som er et digitalt blad for Norsk Geologisk Forening.  Bladet finnes her.

Ny artikkel i PNAS: Geochemical transition zone powering microbial growth in subsurface sediments

ROV hunting for life in the deep ocean Photo: Jebsen Center for Deep Sea Research, UiB, D. Fornari

Researchers from K G Jebsen Centre for Deep Sea Research  at GEO leading a new study published in PNAS today. The marine sedimentary subsurface is a vast and inhospitable ecosystem, often described as a place where microbes “race to their death,” as microbial cells are buried and available energy is severely diminished with increasing depth/age. By combining a variety of biogeochemical and molecular methods to describe the energetics and genetics of the bacteria specialized in anaerobic ammonium oxidation, we show that despite prolonged exposure to highly unfavorable conditions for tens of thousands of years, these bacteria exhibit remarkable net population growth when reaching their niche: the nitrate–ammonium transition zone. This common, yet understudied, geochemical transition zone represents an oasis in the sedimentary energetic desert, and the growth it supports is of major importance for the global nitrogen cycle. Read more from PNAS here. Congratulations 🙂

Ny publikasjon i The Holocene

Opptil 6000 år gamle piler har smelta ut av ei isfonn i Jotunheimen

Under arkeologiske undersøkingar ved Langfonne, ei isfonn som ligg på Kvitingskjølen i Jotunheimen, er det gjort funn av 68 piler som har vore nytta til reinsdyrjakt i tidlegare tider. Dei eldste pilene er daterte til å vere om lag 6000 år gamle. Les mer her fra artikkelen publisert i The Holocene som bl.annet Atle Nesje har vært med på.

Ny publikasjon i PNAS

Klimaet endret seg brått da de nordiske hav gikk fra hvitt til blått. Brå klimaendringer under forrige istid ble utløst av et utbredt tap av sjøis i løpet av 250 år eller mindre. En ny studie dokumenterer at årsaken til at endringene skjedde så fort, lå i havet. Henrik Sadatzki skriver om arbeidet han har ledet.

Les mer fra Bjerknessenteret her. For english read here.

Article on DeepRift Corinth geophysical surveys

Click on the figure to see all figures

New major international geophysical investigation of the Corinth Rift, building on IODP Expedition 381.

As part of the Research Council of Norway funded DeepRift project led by Rob Gawthorpe, an international group of scientists is involved in collecting new high resolution seismic and bathymetry data from the Gulf of Corinth during October and early November 2020.

The Corinth Rift is one of the planet’s most rapidly extending continental rifts.  The rift is geologically a young tectonic feature, forming over the last five million years.  Today the rift is situated along the Gulf of Corinth.  Its high rates of tectonic activity, closed drainage system and high sedimentation rates, makes it an ideal location to examine normal fault growth, rift basin evolution and how the landscape responds to tectonic and climate forcing factors. Read more here.

New major international geophysical investigation of the Corinth Rift, building on IODP Expedition 381.

As part of the Research Council of Norway funded DeepRift project led by Rob Gawthorpe, an international group of scientists is involved in collecting new high resolution seismic and bathymetry data from the Gulf of Corinth during October and early November 2020.

The Corinth Rift is one of the planet’s most rapidly extending continental rifts.  The rift is geologically a young tectonic feature, forming over the last five million years.  Today the rift is situated along the Gulf of Corinth.  Its high rates of tectonic activity, closed drainage system and high sedimentation rates, makes it an ideal location to examine normal fault growth, rift basin evolution and how the landscape responds to tectonic and climate forcing factors.

As well as GEO staff, DeepRift co-investigators include Lisa McNeill (Southampton), Donna Shillington (Northern Arizona), Richard Collier (Leeds), Mary Ford (Lorraine) Kranis Haralambos (Athens) and Dimitris Sakellariou (Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR)).  Within GEO, Martin Muravchik and new PhD candidate, Flávio Norberto de Almeida Júnior will work on the Corinth Rift as part of the DeepRift project, together with a University of Leeds PhD student, Mohammed Mohamed, and University of Lorraine PhD student, Vincent Wicker.  These new studies complement ongoing, VISTA-funded research on the 2017 IODP Expedition 381 boreholes in the Gulf of Corinth by Sofia Pechlivanidou and Natacha Fabregas.

Sakellariou is leading the 2020 DeepRift Gulf of Corinth cruise and using HCMRs R/V Aegaeo research vessel.  The cruise will acquire closely-spaced, high-resolution seismic profiles and ship-based multibeam bathymetric surveys.  We are targeting two main areas of the Corinth Rift that contain depositional systems and structures that are typical of deep-water rift basins, which also allows us understand other active and ancient rift zones around the world, including the Late Jurassic and early Cretaceous of the Norwegian continental shelf.  Our new seismic profiles will be tied into the sites of the 2017 IODP Expedition 381 boreholes in the Gulf of Corinth that cored through the upper ca. 700 m of the rift succession.  The boreholes provide accurate age control and data on sedimentology, palaeontology, palaeoenvironment and physical properties, particularly for the last 800 kyr.  A second cruise, planned for 2021, will use Norwegian AUV facilities to collect sub-metre vertical resolution bathymetry and video of submarine canyons, channel confluences, channel-lobe transitions and submarine fans to help understand deep-water sedimentary processes. Together, our new marine geophysical surveys and the IODP 381 boreholes will allow the highest temporal and spatial resolution record of syn-rift deep-water depositional systems of any rift basin in the world and unparalleled constraints on their development.

News & Views article for Nature Geoscience

Desiree Roerdink has written a News & Views article for Nature Geoscience, in response to a new and controversial article that argues for an oxygen-rich sulfur cycle in the Archean eon (4.0 to 2.5 billion years ago): https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-020-0608-z Congratulations 🙂

 

The Loránd Eötvös Award 2020

The Loránd Eötvös Award 2020 was presented to Tor Arne Johansen and co-authors Bent Ole Ruud, Ronny Tømmerbakke, Kristian Jensen for their paper “Seismic on floatin ice: data arquisition versus flexural wave noise“, published in Geophysical Prospecting, Vol. 67, Mar 2019. Congratulations 🙂

 

Ny publikasjon fra Sunniva Rutledal et al – Flere tusen år gammel aske funnet i Irmingerhavet

Nesten 27.000 år etter vulkanen Hekla hadde et voldsomt utbrudd på Island, fant vi igjen spor av aske i sedimenter fra havbunnen utenfor Grønland. Det gir oss et viktig kronologisk holdepunkt når vi pusler sammen klimahistorien. Les mer fra Bjerknessenteret her

Ny publikasjon i Elements

Eoghan Reeves (GEO), together with Jens Fiebig (Uni. Frankfurt), has written a review of the state of the art on abiotic organic molecules in Earth’s crust in the February issue of The Geochemical Society’s Elements magazine, available here:

http://elementsmagazine.org/past-issues/abiotic-hydrogen-and-hydrocarbons-in-planetary-lithospheres/

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